Plants

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Posts related to Plants:

 

Indoor plants
You don’t have to tend a garden outside to show off your green thumb. There are many beautiful plants which thrive indoors and provide cleaner air while adding a touch of natural color to your home. Find the top picks for beginners!
Propagate succulents
earn how to propagate succulents from leaves in 5 easy steps! In about three weeks, you can easily grow new succulents from the ones you already have with this step-by-step tutorial!

Propagate Succulents

Propagate Succulents

Learn how to propagate succulents from leaves in 5 easy steps! In about three weeks, you can easily grow new succulents from the ones you already have with this step-by-step tutorial!

 

How to Propagate Succulents

 

Step 1

Remove the leaves from the stem carefully and firmly wiggle them from side to side. Make sure to maintain the complete leaves without leaving parts remaining on the stem.

Propagate succulents step 1

Step 2

Once you have the leaves you want to propagate, leave them to dry for 1 to 3 days. Not all the leaves are going to survive, so make sure you take a decent amount.

Propagate succulents step 2

 

Step 3

Place the dried leaves ready to grow on the soil. You will see how the propagation occurs and the roots will find their way towards the interior of the soil themselves.

Propagate succulents step 3

 

Step 4

Gently water the leaves with a light spray, but not too much. Later just water the surface of the terrain when it becomes dry. It is important that you don’t water the leaves before they have completely dried, otherwise they might start to rot.

propagate succulents step 4

 

Step 5

Time to wait for the leaves to sprout roots or until you see new leaves. Be sure to keep them in a warm place with plenty of bright light, but not direct sun. Don’t treat the leaves as ‘adult’ plants because they are delicate. Within three weeks or so, little roots and leaves will begin to sprout!

Propagate succulents step 5

It can take a few months before a succulent gets big enough for re-potting. You’ll know it’s time when the leaf eventually turns brown and falls off. This means the succulent has taken all of the nutrients from the leaf and no longer needs it!

Photography

Photography

I’ve always loved Photography, but never actually learned or mastered the techniques. This lack of knowledge led me to do an online course on Udemy about it, and I will now share the main things I’ve learned there.


Shot Composition Types

  • Perspective
  • Vantage Point
  • Rule of Thirds
  • Dead Space

1. Perspective

Low Angle

The lower that you shoot, the bigger your subject looks.

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High Angle

High angle can make your subject appear smaller and increase the depth of an image.

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Lateral Movement

This is basically moving left to right and shooting the subject from the left, center or right and choose the angle you think looks the best.

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1st Person POV

This shows the photographer’s point of view, usually showing a leg or an arm. This places the viewer in the eye of the photographer.

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2. Composition

Vantage Point: Point of focus created by leading lines. There are two different types of leading lines: geometric and organic.

Geometric

These lines are often found in streets and buildings. They are straight and obvious to follow.

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Organic

These lines are often found in nature like mountains, trees, rivers, etc. They tend to bend and curve more, but always lead to a specific area.

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3. Rule of Thirds

This is the act of separating your frame into 9 parts with 3 columns (grid). You can place the subject on the first or last column to draw attention to the composition as a whole rather than a single point. It includes the background as a second subject and gives a wider picture of what the main subject is looking at.

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4. Dead Space

Dead space is considered any space behind a subject without any distracting elements. It is used to highlight a single subject with nothing more than a wide open area: with backgrounds that are far away, empty, and/ or have just one tone of colour.

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Filling the frame

This is just a style choice, but sometimes it looks nice to add some elements to eliminate dead space with objects in the surrondings.

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Macro Photography

Macro photoghaphy means shooting extremely close up, commonely done on insects and plants.

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Cross-Stitching

Cross-Stitching

If you have no idea what cross stitching is, it’s a type of needlework that uses small x-shaped stitches to create intricate works of art. It has been around for ages, and it is one of the easiest forms of hand embroidery to learn.

Want to try it but don’t know where to start from? This article is here to help you.

Materials you need for cross stitch

If you are new to cross stitch you might wonder what are the best supplies for cross stitch. Below is a list of the essential things you need to cross stitch:

  • Cross Stitch Fabric (most projects are made on Aida or Evenweave Linen fabric)
  • A Cross Stitch Pattern (you can check Pinterest for ideas)
  • An Embroidery Needle (the size will depend on the fabric, but 24 should be OK)
  • Embroidery Floss (after you select the pattern you want to copy, you can check the color codes that you will need to use for that project)
  • Embroidery Hoop (this is optional, but the hoop helps to keep the fabric stretched and you finish stitching you will have your work directly framed in the hoop)

Beginners Tips

First important tip is: start in the middle of your fabric! It’s easier and this way you make sure you have plenty of room for your work. You can quickly find the center by folding your fabric two times double.

Then thread your needle just as you would a needle for hand sewing. Don’t make a knot in the tail end. You will stitch over the tail as you work to secure it without needing a knot. Another important thing is to aim for an even tension on your stitches. Don’t pull too hard as they will warp the fabric, and don’t leave them to loose so they will look sloppy.

One annoying thing about cross stitching is that the embroidery floss tends to get twisted as you stitch. Every once in a while, let your needle hang freely to let the thread unwind.

Also very important: do not forget the backside of your project. Don’t make it look too messy just because no one is going to look at it. Avoid making long jumps because they might show through the openings on the front. When you have to skip more then 4 blank pixels, I recommend that you secure your floss and start with a new thread.

And finally, be consistent in your stitching. The first line of your cross should always be leaning in the same way. It doesn’t matter if you start your cross stitch going ‘////’ or ‘\\\\’ as long as you are consistent with this pattern over the entirety of your project.

How to make a basic cross stitch

Our golden tip for making perfect cross stitches is to start making all the first legs of your cross stitches as per your cross stitch pattern.

After that you can easily stitch the second leg without having to look at your pattern.

Cross stitching projects for beginners

Years ago, I found this cute Garfield pattern online and decided to give it a try. This was my first cross stitching project and it came out really nice. I bought the materials I needed and just went for it! I found out that cross stitching is actually quite relaxing.

Then, years later, as a gift to my boyfriend, I decided to do a cute little panda (as his nickname used to be ‘Panda’).

For this one I bought a kit with all the materials included. I didn’t have time to finish the background of this one, as I had to give this on a specific date, but I think it still looks cute anyways!

Over time cross stitch hasn’t really had the recognition it deserves. It is actually quite fun, relaxing and a bit of a secret talent to have. There is no such as getting bored when you can take your little cross stitch kit with you wherever you go.

Fear not, because all though a finished cross stitch project looks super fancy and detailed, it is actually really easy to pick up. Give it a try and be surprised!

 

Journaling

Journaling

I believe writing can be one of the best ways to deepen our self-awareness and gain clarity about various aspects of our lives. One of my goals for this year is to try journaling every day.

So I prepared this journaling challenge for you. It’s a 21-day challenge so you can really implement this as a new habit, with 21 questions for self-reflection through writing.

Some of the benefits of maintaining a journaling practice are:

  • Find clarity about your thoughts and feelings: Do you often feel confused inside without being able to be sure what you want or are feeling? Writing down what you are thinking and feeling for just a few minutes helps bring clarity to all of this;
  • Knowing Yourself Better: By writing regularly, you are able to identify patterns in your thoughts, understand what causes each of your emotions, and resolve issues that you may have difficulty dealing with;
  • Reduce Stress: Writing about negative emotions such as anger, sadness, disillusionment or shame helps to shed weight and reduce the intensity of those emotions. In addition, we often provoke stress reactions in ourselves because we have a constant and endless loop of thoughts that recur inside our head. The act of writing helps to break this cycle, almost spewing some thoughts from within us to paper;
  • Finding solutions to problems or conflicts: Writing lets you put your thoughts in order and helps you make much clearer connections between different concepts. In addition, problem solving is often found creatively and not just analytically, and writing is a creative activity, you are getting in touch with that part of your brain, helping creative ideas to emerge.

 

Week 1

Day 1

What’s more important in my life?

Day 2

My favorite way to spend the day is…

Day 3

What has surprised me most about my life, or about life in general?

Day 4

Today I make a list of all questions I need an answer for urgently

Day 5

How should I live, knowing I will die?

Day 6

When was the last time I left my comfort zone?

Day 7

Today I make a list of all the things that inspire me: people, books, music, art, quotes, websites, etc.


Week 2

Day 8

What worries me about the future?

Day 9

I feel happy and good on my skin when…

Day 10

What were my biggest mistakes so far and what can I learn about them?

Day 11

How much has my life been under my control so far?

Day 12

Is what others think of me really important?

Day 13

What do I want from life?

Day 14

Which is worse: failing or never trying?


Week 3

Day 15

What topics do I need to learn more about in order to achieve a fuller, more fulfilling life? (Hint: Put time on the calendar to do it!)

Day 16

How do I care about what matters most in my life?

Day 17

What am I abdicating?

Day 18

How would I like others to remember me at the end of my life?

Day 19

If I could talk to my “me” 10 years ago, what would be the most important thing I would have to say?

Day 20

What would you do differently if I loved myself unconditionally?

Day 21

Today I write the words I need to hear myself

 

End of Week 3 Challenge: Do a personal SWOT analysis

Indoor Plants

plants

You don’t have to tend a garden outside to show off your green thumb. There are many beautiful plants which thrive indoors and provide cleaner air while adding a touch of natural color to your home. Find the top picks for beginners!

You don’t have to tend a garden outside to show off your green thumb. There are many beautiful plants which thrive indoors and provide cleaner air while adding a touch of natural color to your home. Whether you are an apartment dweller, a condo owner, or just want to bring a touch of the outdoors in, you’ll be able to choose from plenty of options to find the perfect pick for your personality, style, and experience level.

Some require more light and love, while others are adaptable to a variety of low light and dry conditions. Many plants also filter common contaminants from the air, while releasing extra oxygen for you to breathe. Whether you are looking for hanging foliage, tall plants, or simple succulents, here are the best indoor plants to make your space greener and more lively!

 

Best Indoor Plants for Beginners

 

Chamaedorea

chamaedorea

This plant gained a near-instant following for several good reasons. It’s adapted to relatively low light, can handle lower temperatures, and grows in attractive clumps with light-textured foliage cloaking thin trunks. These factors make the parlor palm one of the most popular indoor palms grown in most temperate countries.

Water: 7 – 14 days

 

Dragon Tree

Dragon Tree

Dragon tree is an attractive, stiff-leaved plant with green sword-like leaves edged with red. In the spring on the outdoor varieties, fragrant tiny white flowers bloom and are followed by circular yellow-orange berries, but on indoor plants, flowers and berries rarely appear. These plants are perfect for a beginner gardener because they’re very easy to grow indoors. Unlike many indoor trees, it tolerates a wide range of temperatures. Dragon trees are tough, drought-tolerant plants with aggressive root systems that make excellent houseplants.

Water: 5 – 7 days

 

Japanese Sago Palm

japanese sago palm

If the Cycas revoluta is your first introduction to the world of indoor palms, you’re in for a treat. Stiff fronds grow in an upright habit from a short, shaggy trunk that resembles a pineapple. This palm is slow-growing and shines when given a site with strong light. Water your sago palm sparingly to avoid problems with crown rot. If you’ve grown your sago palm successfully for years only to experience sudden plant loss, don’t feel bad: the plant has a natural lifespan of about 15 years.

Water: 14 – 21 days

 

Spider Plant

Spider Plant

Despite the creepy-crawly name, the spider plant is among the most popular (and easiest to grow) of all hanging or trailing houseplants. While these exceptionally hardy plants will survive in less than perfect conditions, in perfect conditions they are stunning. A mature plant will form tight rosettes of arching leaves with a profusion of hanging plantlets on long stems, up to three feet, somewhat like a bushy green mane.

Water: 5 – 10 days

 

Weeping Fig Tree

Weeping Fig Tree

Weeping fig grows as a large broadleaf evergreen tree in tropical and subtropical climates, but it is more often grown as a houseplant in homes, offices, and is a popular feature in interior commercial landscaping. It is a rare tree that has a good tolerance for the limited light conditions of indoor environments. Weeping fig is one of the best plants for improving air quality indoors. It has one of the top removal rates for air toxins such as formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene.

Water: 7 – 14 days

 

Philodendron

Heart-Leaf Philodendron

The Philodendron genus contains some of the most beautiful foliage plants in the plant kingdom. Their glossy leaves add a touch of indoor jungle to your home, reminiscent of the tropical areas of the Americas to which they are native. For indoor use, there are two basic types of philodendrons: the climbing varieties and the self-heading (non-climbing) types. The climbing varieties are often used in hanging baskets or trained along a trellis. The non-climbing ones provide excellent upright foliage plants in pots on the floor or table. Often they are valued for their ability to clean the air in your home.

Water: 5 – 10 days

 

English Ivy

Devil's Ivy

English ivy is a very vigorous and aggressive woody evergreen vine. Outdoors, English ivy is used as an ornamental ground-cover or elegant green covering for stone or brick walls. This is the plant that gave Ivy League colleges their name. English ivy is also a very popular indoor houseplant for hanging baskets. English ivy is frequently used as a dense ground-cover in places where turfgrass and other ground-covers do not readily grow. It is also used as an ornamental climbing cover for fences, stone walls, and brick facades.

Water: 7 – 10 days

 

Chinese Evergreen

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For a home that doesn’t receive a lot of natural light, the selection of indoor house plants that will thrive is more limited—but there are still some great choices, mainly this Chinese Evergreen. This plant has variegated green leaves and will produce white blooms and occasionally red berries, which is relatively unique for an indoor plant with low light needs. It does require some humidity, so you may need to mist the plant with a little water if your environment is dry. Note that the plant arrives in a ‘grower pot’ that you will most likely want to replace at some point, but wait until the plant has adjusted to its new environment in your home. The Chinese Evergreen does contain calcium oxalate, so it is poisonous if ingested.

Water: 7 – 9 days

 

Dieffenbachia

Dieffenbachia

Dieffenbachias​ features pointed, broad leaves in a variety of combinations of green and white. A large, well-grown dieffenbachia can reach five feet, with leaves of a foot or more. However, the plants will rarely reach this size in typical indoor conditions. The name of dumb cane comes from the dieffenbachia’s milky sap, which is a mild irritant and should be kept from bare skin. The sap can cause temporary loss of speech. Consider avoiding dieffenbachias if you have small children or pets around the house.

Water: 7 – 9 days

 

Snake Plant

snake plant

Snake Plant is one of the most popular and hardy species of houseplants. An architectural species, it features stiff leaves that range from six inches to eight feet tall, depending on the variety. Sansevieria was first cultivated in China and kept as a treasured houseplant because it was believed the eight gods bestowed their virtues (long life, prosperity, intelligence, beauty, art, poetry, health, and strength) upon those who grew the snake plant. Sansevieria also is among several plants chosen by NASA for a study on how plants can be used for air purification and to combat “sick building syndrome.”

Water: 10 – 15 days

 

Aloe Vera

aloe vera

Aloe vera is commonly grown as a houseplant and gained favor because the gel from its leaves makes a soothing skin salve, although some people are actually irritated by the gel. There are over 300 species of Aloe vera, but the one most commonly grown as a houseplant is Aloe barbadensis. It has thick, succulent leaves that are plumped up with a watery gel. The leaves grow from the base of the plant, in a rosette, and have jagged edges with flexible spines. Young plants don’t generally flower and aloe grown as a houseplant can take years to produce a flower stalk.

Water: 10 – 15 days

 

Bamboo Palm

bamboo palm

Also known as the bamboo palm, the areca palm Dypsis lutescens is popular because of its soft fronds and tolerance of low light. The areca palm prefers a moderate amount of water, although it does tolerate occasional drought. However, they need fairly bright light and they are especially sensitive to the buildup of fertilizer salts. But if you are looking for a good short-lived palm for indoor growth, the areca palm is a popular and relatively inexpensive option.

Water: 5 – 10 days

 

Boston Fern

boston fern

The Boston fern is one of the most well-known ferns and admired for its desirable traits as a houseplant. Boston ferns are typically attractive, with long, graceful fronds bedecked with tiny leaves. It is a relatively tough fern, with a higher tolerance for light than other species, and as far as ferns go, they are more tolerant of dry conditions and easy to propagate. An added bonus is that Boston ferns can be displayed in any number of ways, including on pedestals, in hanging baskets, as part of a grouping, or as lush specimen plants on the right windowsill.

Water: 1 – 3 days

 

Echeveria Succulents

echeveria

Echeverias are one of the most popular types of succulents and are frequently featured in succulent gardens, floral arrangements, terrariums, artwork, and even wedding cakes. Their stunning rosette shape, plump leaves, and large variety of colors give them a striking resemblance to flowers which makes them easy to decorate with. Their unique appearance and low maintenance needs have made Echeverias widely popular. Watering is the most important aspect of proper Echeveria careEcheverias, like most succulents, do not require much water. It is better to under-water Echeverias than to overwater them, as they can quickly succumb to root rot if overwatered.

Water: 10 – 15 days

 

Lucky Bamboo

lucky bamboo

You don’t have to look very hard to find lucky bamboo nowadays. These plants pop up in offices, on desks, in businesses, and in homes pretty much everywhere. An important part of feng shui, lucky bamboo plants are said to bring good luck and fortune, especially if the plants were given as gifts. It also helps that they have a well-earned reputation as nearly indestructible; these tough stalks can survive in vases of pure water or in containers of soil, and in a wide variety of light conditions. Even a poorly kept lucky bamboo plant will live for a long time before it finally succumbs.

Water: 7 – 10 days

 

ZZ Plant

zz plant

Looking for a low-maintenance houseplant to spruce up your space without a big commitment? Look no further than the infamous ZZ plant, also known as the zanzibar gem! Characterized by their shiny, oval-shaped deep green leaves, ZZ plants make excellent additions to any home or office. ZZ plants are tolerant of a wide range of lighting conditions which makes them well-suited to indoor growing. ZZ plants are extremely drought-tolerant and can handle infrequent watering. In general, ZZ plants should be watered once the soil dries out completely—usually once every week or two depending on their growing conditions.

Water: 7 – 14 days

 

Ficus Ginseng (Bonsai Tree)

ficus ginseng

A bonsai tree can create excellent feng shui energy/associations. Bonsai tree plants can be fascinating because you are basically looking at a whole tree in a miniature version. Bonsai come in all shapes and sizes, from one upright tree to a small forest of mostly horizontal shape trees. Many trees and shrubs are trained to grow in a miniature form, from California redwood to cypress and juniper. At their best, the bonsai trees are a beautiful work of art that requires patience and sensibility; at their worst, they can be an eyesore and a source of pain if neglected.

Water: 15 – 21 days

 

Pachira Aquatica (Money Tree)

pachira aquatica

The Money Tree is a species of tree native to Central and South America that has become an attractive houseplant thanks to its hardy nature. First popularized as a houseplant in Taiwan in the 1980s, the Money Tree is prominent among those who practice Feng Shui and is believed to create positive “Chi,” or energy in the home. This has made it a staple in offices, banks, and homes alike. Guiana Chestnut is most commonly sold as a small plant with a braided trunk made up of three, five, or seven stems. The trees are braided by nurseries when they are young and will continue to grow this way as they mature

Water: 10 – 15 days

 

Cactus

cactus

All cactus plants are members of the Cactaceae family, and there are thousands of species of cactus. There are two large groups of cacti grown as houseplants; both are popular and familiar, and both can thrive indoors with relatively little maintenance. The desert cacti are the more “traditional” cacti, usually covered with spines or hair and often growing in paddles, balls, or obelisks. Forest cacti grow in wooded areas, ranging from temperate forests to subtropical and tropical regions. The most well-known forest cacti may be the Christmas cactus. Both desert and forest cacti boast beautiful blooms, but they have very different growing habits.

Water: 15 – 21 days

 

Peace Lily

Peace lily

The peace lily is a tropical species that is a favorite flowering houseplant. The peace lily blooms in spring with long-lasting flowers that hover gracefully over the leaves on the stalks. A well-grown peace lily may bloom twice a year, resulting in several months of flowers. Peace lilies filter more indoor pollutants than most other plants, so are great for bedrooms or other frequented rooms. Inside the tropical plant’s pores, toxic gases like carbon monoxide and formaldehyde are broken down and neutralized.

Water: 5 – 10 days